Kolomeisky Research Group

THEORETICAL BIOPHYSICS
& Statistical Mechanics of Complex Systems


Anatoly B. Kolomeisky

Professor, Department of Chemistry, Rice University
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University
Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University

Phone: 713-348-5672
Email: tolya@rice.edu
Fax: (713) 348-5155

Curriculum Vitae in HTML and PDF formats





Scientific interests:

Scientific interests: statistical mechanics of complex systems, theoretical physical chemistry and biophysics, non-equilibrium statistical physics, random walks, thermodynamics of electrolytes, asymmetric exclusion processes, protein nucleation and crystallization, polymer translocation, biopolymer growth, protein-DNA interactions, molecular dynamics of artificial molecular motors, rotors and nanocars.

INVITED TALKS
  1. Domain-Wall Picture of Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Processes, Department of Chemistry, University of California, San Diego, January 1998.
  2. Motor Proteins and the Forces They Exert, Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. Louis, December, 1999.
  3. Motor Proteins and the Forces They Exert, Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Reno, December, 1999.
  4. Motor Proteins and the Forces They Exert, Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC January, 2000.
  5. Motor Proteins and the Forces They Exert, Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, January, 2000.
  6. Motor Proteins and the Forces They Exert, Department of Chemistry, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, January, 2000.
  7. Nanotechnology: What Can We Learn from Biology, The International Conference NANOSPACE 2001, Galveston, Texas, March, 2001.
  8. Stochastic Models of Biological Transport, Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, September, 2001.
  9. Stochastic Models of Biological Transport, Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, October, 2001.
  10. Stochastic Models of Biological Transport, Department of Biology, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, December, 2001.
  11. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, February, 2002.
  12. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemistry, University of California at Los Angeles, March, 2002.
  13. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, March, 2002.
  14. Stochastic Models of Biological Transport, Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, May, 2002.
  15. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, August, 2002
  16. Lattice Models of Electrolytes, Department of Mathematics, Rice University, Houston,September, 2002.
  17. Simple Stochastic Models Can Explain the Dynamics of Motor Proteins, Symposium COOPERATIVITY IN BIOPHYSICAL SYSTEMS, Institute fur Festkoerperforschung at Forschungcentrum Juelich, Germany, October, 2002.
  18. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore,19-th Southwestern Theoretical Chemistry Conference, University of Houston,November, 2002
  19. Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore,Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, December, 2002.
  20. Stochastic Models with Waiting-Time Distributions for Translocatory Motor Proteins 225-th American Chemical Society National Meeting, New Orleans, March 2003.
  21. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston, April, 2003.
  22. Effect of Detachments in Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Processes European Research Council Chemistry Committees Workshop on Computer Modeling of Chemical and Biological Systems, Porto, Portugal, May 2003.
  23. Physical-Chemical Analysis of the Factors Influencing the Behavior of Flasks During the Heating in Jewelry Casting Process. Development of the Optimal Model of Burnout Furnace 2-nd International Jewelry Symposium JEWELRY MANUFACTURING: TECHNOLOGIES, MAIN PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS, Saint Petersburg, Russia, July 2003.
  24. Simple Models of Electrolytes, 15-h American Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy, Keystone, Colorado, July 2003.
  25. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, October 2003.
  26. Lattice Models of Electrolytes, Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, October 2003.
  27. Phenomenological Theory of Protein Nucleation Phenomena, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, November 2003.
  28. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Long Nanopore, Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University, December 2003.
  29. Nucleation of Ordered Solid Phases of Proteins via Unstable and Metastable High-Density States: Phenomenological Approach, Spring 2004 Materials Research Society, San Francisco, April 2004.
  30. Effect of Detachments in Asymmetric Simple Exlusion Processes, Fock School on Quantum and Computational Chemistry, Novgorod, Russia, April 2004.
  31. Lattice Models of Electrolytes, Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, Ukrainian Academy of Science, Lviv, Ukraine, May 2004.
  32. Understanding Mechanochemical Coupling in Kinesins Using First-Passage Times, Proteomics Workshop IV: Molecular Machines, Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, May 2004.
  33. Physical-Chemical Analysis of the Factors Influencing the Behavior of Flasks During the Heating in Jewelry Casting Process: Development of the Optimal Model of Burnout Furnace , Santa Fe Symposium, Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 2004.
  34. Simple Stochastic Models of Motor Protein Dynamics, SIAM Conference on Mathematical Aspects of Material Science, Los Angeles, May 2004.
  35. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore: Theory Meets Experiments, International Conference on Biological Physics, Goteborg, Sweden, August 2004.
  36. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore: Theory Meets Experiments, Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, September 2004.
  37. Simple Models of Rigid Multifilament Biopolymers's Growth Dynamics, Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachussetts, October 2004.
  38. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Motor Protein Using Simple Stochastic Models?, BU-Harvard-MIT Theoretical Chemistry Lecture Series, Boston, October 2004.
  39. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore: Theory Meets Experiments, Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, October 2004.
  40. Simple Models of Rigid Multifilament Biopolymer's Growth Dynamics, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, October 2004.
  41. Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Through a Nanopore: Theory Meets Experiments, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, December 2004.
  42. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster , Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, May 2005.
  43. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster , 6-th SIAM Conference on Control and its Applicability, Symposium on Brownian Motors and Protein Dynamics, New Orleans, July 2005.
  44. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster , The Telluride Scientific Research Workshop "Single-Molecule Measurements: Kinetics, Fluctuations, and Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics," Telluride, Colorado, August 2005.
  45. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, McGovern Lecture in Biomedical Computing and Imaging, Texas Medical Center, September 2005.
  46. Growth Dynamics of Cytoskeleton Proteins: Multiscale Theoretical Analysis, Workshop I: Multiscale Modeling in Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of California Los Angeles, September 2005.
  47. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, Canada, November 2005.
  48. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, December 2005.
  49. Asymmetric Exclusion Processes on Parallel Channels, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, February 2006.
  50. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, March 2006.
  51. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, University of California Santa Barbara, Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, May 2006.
  52. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins Using Simple Stochastic Models? International Workshop on Stochastic Models in Biological Sciences, Warsaw, Poland, May 2006.
  53. Growth Dynamics of Cytoskeleton Proteins: Multiscale Theoretical Analysis, International Workshop on Multiscale Modeling of Complex Fluids, Prato, Italy, July 2006.
  54. Channel-Facilitated Molecular Transport Across Membranes: Attraction, Repulsion and Asymmetry, Statistical Mechanics Meeting, Rutgers University, New Jersey, December 2006.
  55. Coupling of Two Motor Proteins: a New Motor Can Move Faster, Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Reno, February 2007.
  56. Discrete Stochastic Models of Single-Molecule Motor Protein Dynamics, Workshop Theory, Modeling and Evaluation of Single-Molecule Measurements, Lorentz Center, University of Leiden, Netherlands, April 2007.
  57. Burnt-Bridge Model of Molecular Motor Transport, SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems, Snowbird, Utah, May 2007.
  58. Nucleation of Ordered Solid Phases of Proteins via Unstable and Metastable High-Density States: Phenomenological Approach, Gordon Research Conference on "Thin Films and Growth Mechanisms," Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts, June 2007.
  59. Channel-Facilitated Molecular Transport Across Membranes: Attraction, Repulsion and Asymmetry, Telluride Research Workshop: "Nonequilibrium Phenomena, Nonadiabatic Dynamics and Spectroscopy." Telluride, Colorado, July 2007.
  60. Channel-Facilitated Molecular Transport Across Membranes: Attraction, Repulsion and Asymmetry, 234-th American Chemical Society Annual Meeting, Boston, August 2007.
  61. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion , University of Texas, Austin, September 2007.
  62. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins Using Simple Stochastic Models? University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, September 2007.
  63. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Physics Colloquium, Ramat-Gan, Israel, November 2007.
  64. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Technion, Department of Physics, Haifa, Israel, December 2007.
  65. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, University of Tel Aviv, Department of Chemistry, Tel-Aviv, Israel, December 2007.
  66. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Weizmann Research Institute, Rehovot, Israel, December 2007.
  67. Molecular Motors Interacting with Their Own Tracks , Annual SIAM Conference, San Diego, California, July 2008.
  68. Molecular Motors Interacting with Their Own tracks , International Conference on Statistical Physics SIGMAPHI2008, Crete, Greece, July 2008.
  69. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Syracuse University, Department of Physics Colloquium, September 2008.
  70. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Using Simple Models? Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Boston, September 2008.
  71. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Harvard University, Department of Chemistry, Boston, September 2008.
  72. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Max-Planck Institute of Polymer Sciences, Mainz, Germany, November 2008.
  73. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, University of Stuttgart, Department of Physics, Germany, November 2008.
  74. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Max-Planck Institute of Colloidal Sciences, Potsdam, Germany, December 2008.
  75. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Using Simple Models? Research Center Juelich, Germany, December 2008.
  76. How Proteins Find Its Targets on DNA: Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion, Technical University of Munich, Department of Physics, Germany, December 2008.
  77. Motor Proteins: A Theorist's View, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Center fro Nanosciences, Germany, December 2008.
  78. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Polymer Translocation Using Simple Models? Mesilla Workshop on Multi-Scale Modeling of Biological Systems, Las Cruces, New Mexico, February 2009.
  79. Thermally-Driven Nanocars and Molecular Rotors: What Can We Learn from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, 237 ACS National Meeting, Salt Lake City, March 2009.
  80. Spatial Fluctuations Affect Dynamics of Motor Proteins, Max-Planck Institute for Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden, Germany, May 2009.
  81. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Laboratory of Statistical Physics, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France, May 2009.
  82. How Proteins Find Targets on DNA, International Conference "From DNA-inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired DNA," ICTP, Trieste, Italy, June 2009.
  83. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, XIV Statistical Physics Minisymposium, Institute of Mathematics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland, June 2009.
  84. Thermally-Driven Nanocars and Molecular Rotors: What Can We Learn from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, University of Zelena Gura, Department of Physics, Poland, June 2009.
  85. Thermally-Driven Nanocars and Molecular Rotors: What Can We Learn from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Telluride Research Workshop on Single Molecules, Telluride, Colorado, June 2009.
  86. Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins: A Theorist's View, Laboratory of Statistical Physics, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France, July 2009.
  87. Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins: A Theorist's View, University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Chicago, September 2009.
  88. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, University of Chicago, Department of Chemistry, September 2009.
  89. Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins: A Theorist's View, University of Texas, Center for Nonlinear Dynamics, Austin, November 2009.
  90. Theoretical Studies of Coupled Parallel Exclusion Processes, Indian Institute of Technology, Golden Jubilee Conference on Non-Equilibrium Statistical Physics, Kanpur, India, January 2010.
  91. Spatial Fluctuations Affect Dynamics of Motor Proteins, Indian Institute of Technology, Golden Jubilee Conference on Interaction, Stability, Transport and Kinetics, Kanpur, India, February 2010.
  92. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India, January 2010.
  93. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Tata Institute for Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India, February 2010.
  94. Interactions between Motor Proteins can Explain Collective Transport of Kinesins, Biophysical Society Meeting, Mini-Symposium "Tug of War - Molecular Motors Interact," San Francisco, February 2010.
  95. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Arizona State University, Center for Biological Physics, Tempe, Arizona, March 2010.
  96. Channel-Facilitated Molecular Transport Across Cellular Membranes, The Ohio State University, Mathematical Biosciences Institute, Workshop "Transport in Cells," Columbus, Ohio, April 2010.
  97. Can We Understand the Complex Dynamics of Molecular Motors Using Simple Models? Conference "Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Molecular Motors," Santa Fe, New Mexico, May 2010.
  98. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France, June 2010.
  99. Channel-Facilitated Molecular Transport Across Cellular Membranes, ESPCI, Paris, France, June 2010.
  100. Dynamic Properties of Motor Proteins in the Divided-Pathway Model, SIAM Conference on Life Sciences, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, July 2010.
  101. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Department of Material Sciences, November 2010.
  102. Nanocars and Molecular Rotors: What are Fundamental Mechanisms of Motion? Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, May 2011.
  103. What Are Fundamental Mechanisms for the Motion of Nanocars and Molecular Rotors on Surfaces? 43-rd IUPAC World Chemistry Congress, San Juan, Puerto Rico, August 2011.
  104. Dynamics of Nanocars and Molecular Rotors on Surfaces: What Are Fundamental Mechanisms? Conference on Functional and Nanostructured Materials FNMA-11, Szczecin, Poland, September 2011.
  105. How to Accelerate Protein Search for Targets on DNA: Location and Dissociation, Conference "DNA Search: From Biophysics to Cell Biology," Safed, Israel, September 2011.
  106. Physical-Chemical Aspects of Protein-DNA Interactions: Mechanisms of Facilitated Target Search, CECAM Workshop "Dynamics of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions: Integrating Simulations with Experiments," Zurich, Switzerland, September 2011.
  107. Formation of a Morphogen Gradient, NORDITA, Stockholm, Sweden, October 2011.
  108. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, November 2011.
  109. Dynamics of Nanocars and Molecular Rotors on Surfaces: What Are Fundamental Mechanisms? Institute of Chemical Physics, Dalian, China, December 2011.
  110. Formation of Signaling Molecules Concentration Profiles, Department of Chemistry, Peking University, beijing, China, December 2011.
  111. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Zhejang University, Hangzhou, China, December 2011.
  112. Dynamics of Nanocars and Molecular Rotors on Surfaces: What Are Fundamental Mechanisms?Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, China, December 2011.
  113. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, December 2011.
  114. Can We Understand Complex Dynamics of Motor Proteins Using Simple Models? Conference "Multiscale Methods and Validation in Medicine and Biology," San Francisco, California, February 2012.
  115. How Proteins Find and Recognize Their Targets on DNA, Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, March 2012.
  116. Formation of Signaling Molecules Concentration Profiles, Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, March 2012.
  117. Formation of a Morphogen Gradient: Acceleration by Dissociation, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, March 2012.
  118. How to Understand Signaling Mechanisms in Biological Development, Department of Chemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, April 2012.
  119. Formation of a Morphogen Gradient: Acceleration by Dissociation, Department of Physics, University of Barcelona, Spain, May 2012.
  120. Mechanism of Fast Protein Search for Targets on DNA: Strong Coupling between 1D and 3D Motions, International Workshop "Search and Stochastic Phenomena in Complex Physical and Biological Systems,'' Palma de Mallorca, Spain, June 2012.
  121. How Interactions Control Transport through Channels, CECAM Workshop, "Polymer Translocation through Nanopores," Mainz, Germany, September 2012.
  122. How Interactions Control Transport through Channels, Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, October 2012.
  123. Mechanism of Fast Protein Search for Targets on DNA: Strong Coupling between 1D and 3D Motions, Michael E. Fisher's Symposium, University of Maryland, College Park, October 2012.
  124. How Interactions Affect Multiple Kinesin Dynamics, American Physical Society Meeting, Baltimore, March 2013.
  125. Random Hydrolysis Controls the Dynamic Instability in Microtubules, SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamic Systems, Snowbird, Utah, May 2013.
  126. Speed-Selectivity Paradox in the Protein Search for Targets on DNA, Is It Real or Not? Telluride Workshop on Biophysical Dynamics, Telluride, Colorado, July 2013.
  127. How Interactions Control Transport through Channels, Telluride Workshop on Nonequilibrium Phenomena, Nonadiabatic Dynamics and Spectroscopy, Telluride, Colorado, July 2013.
  128. Mechanisms and Topology Determination of Complex Networks from First-Passage Theoretical Approach, Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics in China, Statphys Satellite Conference, Beijing, China, July 2013.
  129. Mechanisms and Topology Determination of Complex Networks from First-Passage Theoretical Approach, International Conference on Multiscale Motility of Molecular Motors, Potsdam, Germany, September 2013.
  130. How to Understand Signaling Mechanisms in Biological Development, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, September 2013.
  131. How to Understand Complex Processes in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Using Simple Models, Norway-Texas Collaborative Research Seminar, Trondheim, Norway, October 2013.
  132. Mechanisms and Topology Determination of Complex Networks from First-Passage Theoretical Approach, South-West Regional Meeting of American Chemical Society, Waco, TX, November 2013.
  133. How to Understand Signaling Mechanisms in Biological Development, Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, April 2014.
  134. Speed-Selectivity Paradox in the Protein Search for Targets on DNA, Is It Real or Not? Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden, June 2014.
  135. How to Understand the Formation of Morphogen Gradients during Biological Development, Mini-Symposium ``Application of Statistical Physics in Quantitative Biology,'' 9-th European Conference on Mathematical and Theoretical Biology, Goteborg, Sweden, June 2014.
  136. How to Understand Signaling Mechanisms in Biological Development, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, September 2014.
  137. How to Understand Mechanism of Protein Search for Targets on DNA, Department of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, october 2014.
  138. How to Understand Mechanism of Protein Search for Targets on DNA, Department of Physics, University of Rio Grande du Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil, October 2014.
  139. How to Understand Signaling Mechanisms in Biological Development, Center for Fundamental Studies in Physics, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, October 2014.
  140. Dynamics of the Singlet Fission Process, Workshop "Biologically Inspired Light-Driven Processes," Rice University, Houston, TX, December 2014.
  141. How to Understand Mechanism of Protein Search for Targets on DNA, Free University of Brussels, Departmen of Physics, Brussels, Belgium, June 2015.
  142. Dynamics of Assembly and Disassembly of Microtubule Protein Filaments: Theoretical Analysis, Francqui Symposium on Aggregation of Biological Molecules, Brussels, Belgium, June 2015.